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In our society it is important that owners are responsible for the welfare of their animal as well as the welfare of any offspring from that animal. This means that owners need to take responsibility for the animal that they own as well as any offspring that results from mating their animal with another animal of the same species. Owners also have a responsibility for the society that we live in – it is important that animals are not just bred and then the offspring are abandoned. This not only puts a cost on society for that animal but also the health and wellbeing for the abandoned animal is severely limited.

So let us look at some of the comments that abound when discussing male and female desexing.

SHOULD MALE DOGS AND CATS BE DESEXED?

It seems to be accepted generally within our community that all female dogs and cats should be desexed unless the owner has their heart set on having puppies or kittens running around the house or yard.

But what about the male animals – should they be desexed? The simple answer is YES.

Whenever I am having a conversation with owners about the benefits of having a male animal desexed it seems to me that the female owner has no problems with castrating their animal but the male owner seems to have a lot of trouble coming to terms with removing the testicles of the animal. In fact most male owners seem to stand crossed legged every time the subject is raised.

I am sure that the male owner feels that the desexed male animal will start barking or meowing in a high pitched squeaky voice and that the animal will become uncontrollably attracted to other male animals of the same species.

I am afraid to say – but the stories that are told about the level of testosterone in an animal’s body and its effect on the vocal cords as well as its effect on what sex the animal will be attracted to – are all rubbish and should remain as children’s stories told in the playground of the schoolyard.

There are many benefits from having a male dog or cat desexed. They can no longer fertilise and cause unwanted puppies or kittens. If you are not sure what problem that can cause – ring the RSPCA and find out how many kittens and puppies come to their place every week and most need to be euthanased.

The aggressiveness is diminished – this makes it easier for the owner to handle and train their animal. It also minimizes that number of animal fights – this is very important in cats because it in impossible to confine a cat to its own yard. It also minimizes the number of people who are bitten and savaged by aggressive male dogs.

It stops cats from spraying and dogs from lifting their leg and urinating on every object around the yard and around the neighbourhood.

It removes the development of testicular cancer and also diminishes the development of prostate cancer.

It makes the animal a better pet and more loving for the family to enjoy and isn’t that why you have the animal in the first place.

To own an animal is a privilege not a “God-Given Right” and the sooner people become responsible for the animals welfare as well as being responsible for their animal’s actions – the better our society will be.

Do yourself, and your animal, a favour as well as doing society a favour – get your male animal desexed. Ring your veterinarian and discuss the operation and benefits.

The best time to castrate a male dog or cat is 6 months of age

SHOULD FEMALE DOGS AND CATS BE DESEXED?

In our opinion all female dogs and cats should be desexed unless the owner really wants to breed.

Unless the owner has a burning desire to get puppies or kittens from the female then there is no benefit for allowing the female animal to breed. There have been numerous studies done throughout the world trying to demonstrate benefits to the female animal should she be allowed to breed and in all cases the female animal did NOT benefit and in some cases the breeding has a detrimental effect on the breeding female.

In a lot of cases the female changed for the worst after having the young – they lost their puppy outlook on life, in some cases they became aggressive to members of the family, some became depressed and others became unmanageable and developed phobias such as separation anxiety, fear of loud noises etc.

Owners should also consider the financial side of breeding – some female animals need caesarians (an operation) to get the young out of their abdomen. Some female animals are not good mothers or do not produce milk and then the owner will need to orphan rear the animal – that means feeding the young every 2 hours day and night for a few weeks. There can be large veterinary bills associated with mastitis, infections of the uterus or vagina, cystitis, orphan rearing the pups etc.

There are a number of positives to getting your animal desexed – there is less likely hood  of developing cancer of the uterus, you eliminate the chance of ovarian cancer, you minimize the chance of developing Pyometra (a serious and sometimes deadly infection of the uterus). You also decrease the development of problems associated with mating – that is venereal diseases, fight wounds, car accidents that occur when the female animal is looking for a mate etc.

Desexing the female dog or cat makes the animal a better pet and more loving for the family to enjoy, and isn’t that why you have the animal in the first place?

To own an animal is a privilege not a “God-Given Right” and the sooner people become responsible for the animals welfare as well as being responsible for their animals actions – the better our society will be.

Do yourself, and your animal, a favour as well as doing society a favour – get your female animal desexed. Ring your veterinarian and discuss the operation and benefits.

The best time to desex a female dog or cat is 6 months of age.

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